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Posted on 21st Oct at 7:39 AM, with 128 notes
Artwork

Refused - Refused Are Fucking Dead

Tagged: #music,
Posted on 20th Oct at 11:55 PM, with 188,525 notes

tocifer:

ryyde:

i was trying to make my friend a bday cake but the dye on the decorative icing started leaking and dripping everywhere so it accidentally became the most ominous and violent looking baked good ive ever seen…… i slapped on some sprinkles to try and make it less threatening looking. it worked a little bit.

BIRTH

Posted on 19th Oct at 10:51 PM, with 7 notes
postapocalypticbabe:

Murdered my best friend historicalfuture
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postapocalypticbabe:

Murdered my best friend historicalfuture

Tagged: #me, #:),
Posted on 18th Oct at 1:13 PM, with 123 notes
marxvx:

Hormel Meatpackers’ Strike, 1984
Hormel’s slaughterhouse in Austin, MN had an injury rate at 2,000% the national average, with 200 injuries for every 100 workers.
Hormel management implemented a 25% wage cut, flooring wages from $10.69 to $8.25 - a loss of about $100 per week. Management also gutted workers’ healthcare retroactively; meaning if they had used their insurance for themselves or their families, they were immediately indebted to the company.
Slaughterhouse workers quickly ousted the leaders of their union - United Food & Commercial Workers Local P-9 - and voted in a reform slate who vowed to resist all of Hormel’s concessions.
P-9 members voted over 90% in favor of a strike and eventually walked out. UFCW International leaders fiercely opposed the strike. The AFL-CIO eventually prohibited other unions from providing any assistance to the strikers and their local, effectively isolating them from the rest of the labor movement.
The UFCW International was so furiously opposed to the strike that they actively encouraged union members to scab on their own picket line.
At the height of the strike, strike benefits were down to just $40 per week ($90 in 2014). The strikers organized a soup kitchen to feed the picketers with the help of local farmers.
Hormel tried to pressure Austin’s mayor to suppress the strike - but the mayor himself was one of the strikers. The City Council went over the mayor’s head, called in the National Guard, and declared martial law. Picketing was banned.
In spite of the police and International Union repression, P-9 workers flew their pickets down 250 miles to the next Hormel plant. Sympathetic slaughterhouse workers at that plant staged a strike and picketed in solidarity with P-9ers.
Eventually, with the union’s leaders indicted on “criminal syndicalism” laws from the Red Scare, the International Union took over P-9 and crushed the strike. But P-9 still went hard as fuck.
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marxvx:

Hormel Meatpackers’ Strike, 1984

  • Hormel’s slaughterhouse in Austin, MN had an injury rate at 2,000% the national average, with 200 injuries for every 100 workers.
  • Hormel management implemented a 25% wage cut, flooring wages from $10.69 to $8.25 - a loss of about $100 per week. Management also gutted workers’ healthcare retroactively; meaning if they had used their insurance for themselves or their families, they were immediately indebted to the company.
  • Slaughterhouse workers quickly ousted the leaders of their union - United Food & Commercial Workers Local P-9 - and voted in a reform slate who vowed to resist all of Hormel’s concessions.
  • P-9 members voted over 90% in favor of a strike and eventually walked out. UFCW International leaders fiercely opposed the strike. The AFL-CIO eventually prohibited other unions from providing any assistance to the strikers and their local, effectively isolating them from the rest of the labor movement.
  • The UFCW International was so furiously opposed to the strike that they actively encouraged union members to scab on their own picket line.
  • At the height of the strike, strike benefits were down to just $40 per week ($90 in 2014). The strikers organized a soup kitchen to feed the picketers with the help of local farmers.
  • Hormel tried to pressure Austin’s mayor to suppress the strike - but the mayor himself was one of the strikers. The City Council went over the mayor’s head, called in the National Guard, and declared martial law. Picketing was banned.
  • In spite of the police and International Union repression, P-9 workers flew their pickets down 250 miles to the next Hormel plant. Sympathetic slaughterhouse workers at that plant staged a strike and picketed in solidarity with P-9ers.
  • Eventually, with the union’s leaders indicted on “criminal syndicalism” laws from the Red Scare, the International Union took over P-9 and crushed the strike. But P-9 still went hard as fuck.
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